Staying flexible without spinning in circles

Staying flexible without spinning in circles

I’ve recently been thinking about the spectrum of flexibility and adaptability and where the optimal level lies. I’m going to share my thoughts here as I think through this.

On one hand, I think it is important to be highly flexible so as to be able to adapt to the situation and adjust actions, behavior, and  decisions as new information arises. On the other hand, there has to be a certain level of stability so as to not be jumping, changing direction, and spinning in circles with every single new piece of information. There is likely an optimal level somewhere in the middle.

I think that to maintain this “optimal level,” it helps to have a bigger-picture goal and perspective in mind. This can ultimately help with minimizing the spinning, because with a bigger goal in mind, the smaller details matter less and do not derail us as much. Having this goal also helps to keep us focused on finding the best way to get there, which means remaining flexible enough to pay attention to the feedback points on what is and is not working, and adjusting based on this. These points are more informative when we pay attention to the patterns that arise over time rather than each individual one-time occurrence, helping us to remain flexible to adjust to bigger themes but not constantly changing based on every single new data point.

How do I handle this? I tend to have my bigger goals in mind (e.g., start a company, find a place where I’d like to live more permanently, etc), along with plans on how to get there, but I am very willing to adapt these plans based on new information. As part of this, I am extremely clear on what I know and do not know (for example, these days I’m quite clear that I do not know where exactly I want to live). I am transparent about these points of uncertainty, both with myself and with others, because it enables me to more easily seek and gather other perspectives, which often help me to gain clarity. This helps me be especially adaptable on these open points, because these are exactly the areas that I should be changing as I get new information to test what works and doesn’t work and eventually move toward having a stronger perspective and making decisions that move me closer to my goals.

As I run more “tests” by trying a variety of things and continuously gathering opinions, I begin to develop stronger perspectives across multiple areas, and these areas become slightly more fixed. As I gain higher “certainty” in my opinions and hypotheses, I still remain willing to adapt with new information, but the bar for the level of information required cause me to change those points becomes increasingly higher – i.e., for areas with high points of certainty, I would need materially new information to change my perspective. Of course, this should all be taken from the perspective of understanding that we definitely don’t know everything, and should always remain highly open-minded. 

I believe that I am somewhere in the middle in terms of my adaptability. Above all, I maintain a bigger-picture goal that I try to work toward, which helps me to keep all of the more minor points in perspective. I’m highly adaptable for areas in which I am less certain (and therefore I explore these a great deal), but I become somewhat less adaptable as I develop higher confidence levels in my perspectives and certainty (based on feedback) that this works to help me move toward my goals.

So, I suppose that I answered my own question. There is not really a right answer on the “optimal” level of adaptability, but what does help is keeping a bigger-picture goal in mind to serve as a guidepost for what matters and doesn’t matter (i.e., patterns rather than one-time data points). We should start out with a “hypothesis” plan, but be clear on where we are more “uncertain,” and be open to gathering information on what works and does not work. Even when we are more “certain,” maintaining open-mindedness over time is still very important. 

As we gain more information, we should look to increasingly “fill the gaps” on the uncertainties, and become more certain, point by point. We should still maintain flexibility to change the approach based on materially new information, but not spin in circles with every single minor detail.